Having Good Rhythm In Your Bowling Approach By MDM Bowling Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Rhythm (Featuring Ashly Galante)

Pro Tip Friday: The Rhythm is Gonna Get YouEvery sport has a rhythm. In bowling, your rhythm is about how your footwork and armswing work together to get you to the foul line in the right way. You have to picture it like very simple dance routine. Take a look at this video of Ashly Galante when she came in to the shop last week. Her rhythm is repeatable and helps her build power throughout her approach. If you pay attention to the majority of professional bowlers, like Ashly, they look like they are repeating the same dance routine every time.Your foot rhythm should start off slow in order to generate momentum at the end. You want to support the ball swinging your arm effortlessly vs your arm needing to swing the ball. The typical rhythm taught in a five-step approach is: first step: slow, second: slow, third: slow, fourth: quick, then: power slide. In a typical five-step approach, you push the ball away on your second step. For a four-step approach, the recommended rhythm is: first step: slow, second: slow, third: quick, then slide, with the pushaway on the first step. This pace generates momentum in the right part of your approach so you are consistent, balanced and can create more power in your release with less effort.A lot of times when people feel jerky or robotic, it’s because their rhythm is off. They will start off walking too fast and then have to decelerate to compensate. Or they start off slow and get quick on the wrong step and end up playing catch up at the foul line. Overall, they’ll feel unbalanced and out of time. There are obviously exceptions to the rule when it comes to rhythm. Shorter people (like Norm Duke, Marshall Holman) will want to get their feet started faster to get the right ball speed. Taller people (like Wes Mallott, Mika Koivuniemi) may have slower footwork. The constant is that they have a repeatable rhythm that supports them getting to the foul line in a balanced way. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #teamgalante

Posted by MDM Coaching on Wednesday, May 30, 2018

 

The Rhythm Or Cadence In Your Approach Is Key For Success

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Every sport has a rhythm. In bowling, your rhythm is about how your footwork and armswing work together to get you to the foul line in the right way. You have to picture it like very simple dance routine. Take a look at this video of Ashly Galante when she came into the shop last week. Her rhythm is repeatable and helps her build power throughout her approach. If you pay attention to the majority of professional bowlers, like Ashly, they look like they are repeating the same dance routine every time.

What Is A Good Rhythm For My Bowling Approach?

Your foot rhythm should start off slow in order to generate momentum at the end. You want to support the bowling ball swinging your arm effortlessly vs your arm needing to swing the ball. The typical rhythm taught in a five-step approach is

first step: slow

second step: slow

third step: slow

fourth step: quick

then: power slide.

In a typical five-step approach, you push the ball away on your second step. For a four-step approach, the recommended rhythm is: first step: slow, second: slow, third: quick, then slide, with the pushaway on the first step. This pace generates momentum in the right part of your approach so you are consistent, balanced and can create more power in your release with less effort.

How To Smooth Out Your Approach

A lot of times when people feel jerky or robotic, it’s because their rhythm is off. They will start off walking too fast and then have to decelerate to compensate. Or they start off slow and get quick on the wrong step and end up playing catch up at the foul line. Overall, they’ll feel unbalanced and out of time. There are obviously exceptions to the rule when it comes to rhythm. Shorter people (like Norm Duke, Marshall Holman) will want to get their feet started faster to get the right ball speed. Taller people (like Wes Mallott, Mika Koivuniemi) may have slower footwork. The constant is that they have a repeatable rhythm that supports them getting to the foul line in a balanced way. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching

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