How To Stop Leaving 10 Pins Or 7 Pins By MDM Bowling Coaching

Pro Tip Friday: Why am I leaving 10 pins?

Pro Tip Friday: Why am I leaving 10 pins?On an ideal strike, the ball hits four pins total in a ten-pin rack (1,3,5,9 for a righty/1,2,5,8 for a lefty). The reason we leave pocket 8s, 9s, and 10s (7s for lefties) is poor entry angle – either too much or too little. Entry angle is the angle that the bowling ball needs to enter the pocket in order to carry a strike. The USBC has determined that the optimal entry is between 4 and 6 degrees on board 17.5 for a right-handed player.When a right-handed bowler is talking to me about leaving too many 10 pins (flip this tip to the other side of the rack for a lefty), I normally review entry angle. If your angle is off, the 6-pin will not cooperate and hit the 10-pin in the right way. If you hear people say that the ball is coming up behind the headpin and leaving a lot of 10s, that means that the ball is rolling in to the 3 pin heavier than the 1 pin, knocking the 6 pin a different way, causing it to hit the wall and go around the 10 pin. That kind of pin reaction will result in a ringing 10-pin. Flat 10s are a result of the ball hitting the pocket too straight, causing the 3-pin to throw the 6-pin in front of the 10-pin.Visualize a fix to this problem: when the ball hits the pocket, you want it to roll in to the 8-pin of a full rack. Pay attention to how your ball hits the pins. If you see your ball drive in to the 8-pin, it will deflect properly and kick out the 10. If your ball is rolling in to the 9-pin at the back of the pin deck, you’ll leave more 10 pins because of lack of or too much entry angle. You need to watch your ball hitting the rack until it leaves the pin deck to understand where it is rolling.If your ball is entering at the wrong angle, your ball could be too strong, your hand could be on the outside of the ball resulting in too little leverage, or your drilling pattern could cause the ball roll out too quickly. One option is to move left to where the ball won’t hook so early and roll out. While some people like to, I don’t recommend moving up or back on the approach because I think it affects people’s timing too significantly. The fix to the problem is going to be personal and based on a number of factors. The first step in correcting entry angle is to understand how your ball is hitting the pins so that you can adjust from there. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching

Posted by MDM Coaching on Wednesday, May 30, 2018

 

Why Am I Leaving 10 Pins When I Bowl?

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On an ideal strike, the bowling ball hits four pins total in a ten-pin rack (1,3,5,9 for a righty/1,2,5,8 for a lefty). The reason we leave pocket 8s, 9s, and 10s (7s for lefties) is poor entry angle – either too much or too little. Entry angle is the angle that the bowling ball needs to enter the pocket in order to carry a strike. The USBC has determined that the optimal entry is between 4 and 6 degrees on board 17.5 for a right-handed player.

When a right-handed bowler is talking to me about leaving too many 10 pins (flip this tip to the other side of the rack for a lefty), I normally review entry angle. If your angle is off, the 6-pin will not cooperate and hit the 10-pin in the right way. If you hear people say that the ball is coming up behind the headpin and leaving a lot of 10s, that means that the ball is rolling in to the 3 pin heavier than the 1 pin, knocking the 6 pin a different way, causing it to hit the wall and go around the 10 pin. That kind of pin reaction will result in a ringing 10-pin. Flat 10s are a result of the ball hitting the pocket too straight, causing the 3-pin to throw the 6-pin in front of the 10-pin.

How To Not Leave The 10 Pin

Visualize a fix to this problem: when the ball hits the pocket, you want it to roll in to the 8-pin of a full rack. Pay attention to how your ball hits the pins. If you see your ball drive in to the 8-pin, it will deflect properly and kick out the 10. If your ball is rolling in to the 9-pin at the back of the pin deck, you’ll leave more 10 pins because of lack of or too much entry angle. You need to watch your ball hitting the rack until it leaves the pin deck to understand where it is rolling.

If your ball is entering at the wrong angle, your ball could be too strong, your hand could be on the outside of the ball resulting in too little leverage, or your drilling pattern could cause the ball roll out too quickly. One option is to move left to where the ball won’t hook so early and roll out. While some people like to, I don’t recommend moving up or back on the approach because I think it affects people’s timing too significantly. The fix to the problem is going to be personal and based on a number of factors. The first step in correcting entry angle is to understand how your ball is hitting the pins so that you can adjust from there. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching

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2 thoughts on “How To Stop Leaving 10 Pins Or 7 Pins By MDM Bowling Coaching

  1. JH says:

    This was very helpful. I keep leaving 7 pins (lefty bowler) and am researching to understand why, and this confirmed my suspicions. I will watch my ball more closely in tonight’s league.

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