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How Can You Create a Free Bowling Arm Swing?

Pro Tip Friday: Pulling Down

Pro Tip Friday: Pulling DownAn ideal swing is an efficient swing. A lot of times, I see people force the bowling ball in to a spot on to the lane and miss their target. This is a very common tendency. What ends up happening is that they grab the ball at the top of the swing and pull it down from there, also known as a steep swing. Why is that bad? Your hand locks up in the ball more and you end up decelerating out of it. When you muscle your swing in this way, you might feel like you’re throwing it faster but you can’t create the same speed with your arm as you will with momentum from gravity, especially when you disrupt the flow. In addition to losing efficiency, injuries can happen because of this – tendinitis, blisters on your thumb, forearm soreness.How do you know if you’re doing this? If, over time, the bowling ball feels heavier than when you first started bowling that day, it’s an indication that you’re using the muscles in your arms vs momentum. Another indication is that your bowling ball could be hooking in different parts of the lane. An example is if you feel like you threw a really good ball but it’s not reacting the same. It could be because the ball goes in to the lane at a steeper angle off your hand, causing the ball to hook early or roll out. Another indication is that your shoulder could be hurting after bowling. People who normally pull the ball down from the top use their shoulder too much, which can cause soreness.If you feel like you are one of these people who pull the ball down, there are a number of drills that you can do to work on it. One of my favorite drills is a set-up swing drill (https://www.facebook.com/MDMcoaching/videos/255673601814598/). Basically, when you’re in your set-up, before you take your first step, you want to push the ball out as far as possible, then let gravity take the ball, and let the weight of your ball swing your arm. Do this 2-3 times, then set up and go without thinking too much. You don’t want to try to lower your swing. You don’t want to try to muscle anything in this drill. As always, there’s no replacement for good help. I recommend getting time with a qualified coach to help you assess if you’re pulling the ball down and how to fix it. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart

Posted by MDM Coaching on Thursday, January 31, 2019

An ideal swing is an efficient swing. A lot of times, I see people force the bowling ball in to a spot on to the lane and miss their target. This is a very common tendency. What ends up happening is that they grab the bowling ball at the top of the swing and pull it down from there, also known as a steep swing. Why is that bad? Your hand locks up in the bowling ball more and you end up decelerating out of it. When you muscle your swing in this way, you might feel like you’re throwing it faster but you can’t create the same speed with your arm as you will with momentum from gravity, especially when you disrupt the flow. In addition to losing efficiency, injuries can happen because of this – tendinitis, blisters on your thumb, forearm soreness.

As always, there’s no replacement for good help. I recommend getting time with a qualified coach to help you assess if you’re pulling the ball down and how to fix it. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart

How do you know if your bowling arm swing is not free? 

If, over time, the bowling ball feels heavier than when you first started bowling that day, it’s an indication that you’re using the muscles in your arms vs momentum. Another indication is that your bowling ball could be hooking in different parts of the lane. An example is if you feel like you threw a really good ball but it’s not reacting the same. It could be because the ball goes in to the lane at a steeper angle off your hand, causing the ball to hook early or roll out. Another indication is that your shoulder could be hurting after bowling. People who normally pull the ball down from the top use their shoulder too much, which can cause soreness.

Drills to help you create a free bowling arm swing

If you feel like you are one of these people who pull the ball down, there are a number of drills that you can do to work on it. One of my favorite drills is a set-up swing drill. Basically, when you’re in your set-up, before you take your first step, you want to push the ball out as far as possible, then let gravity take the ball, and let the weight of your ball swing your arm. Do this 2-3 times, then set up and go without thinking too much. You don’t want to try to lower your swing. You don’t want to try to muscle anything in this drill.

Pro Tip Friday: Hitting the Reset Button

Pro Tip Friday: Hitting the Reset ButtonIf you ever feel like you need a reset button on your game – you're out of rhythm, your timing is off, you’re muscling the ball, your footwork is not right, etc – I recommend doing a free swing ball drill before your approach (it's what I do in these situations). This gets your upper body muscles in a position to be relaxed, so when you do your full approach, you are able to focus on your feet vs your arm swing. Depending on how I’m feeling, I’ll swing the ball 1-2 times, so I don't overdo the drill and throw my timing off in other ways. I'll use this tool in league, tournaments, and practice.A lot of people get out of rhythm because the ball is in the wrong part of the swing as they are walking to the line, causing them to muscle it and have an inconsistent release. This simple swing drill forces the weight of the ball in to your fingertips, which prevents muscling. When you bring the ball back up from the drill, make sure to put the weight in your non-bowling hand. That triggers your body to relax your bowling arm and all of the small muscles in your hand, so that when you pushaway, swing the ball in your approach, and release the ball, your hand is as soft and relaxed as possible. #protipfriday #mdmcoaching #iambowlersmart

Posted by MDM Coaching on Friday, September 28, 2018

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